🐾 We have no available puppies at this time!! 🐾


Our next planned litter will be 2021 Fall!!

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All of our puppies have up-to-date vaccinations, Microchipped, Dewclaws removed, Dewormed, two-year health guarantee, as well as a health certificate


A puppy-go-home bag will be provided which includes a two week supply of puppy food, a leash, a collar, a grooming brush, a month supply of Heartgard and Nexgard as well as other puppy essentials!


These puppies will be socialized, held, and played with to ensure great family pets. They will start being potty-trained at four weeks of age to ease their transition into your home.


All puppies come with a limited two year health guarantee under the condition that the puppy was regularly seen by a veterinarian during the duration of time it was under the care of the buyer.




Vaccination Schedule 

In Accordance with the American Kennel Club (AKC) Guidelines

Important Vaccinations For Your Pup

Canine Distemper - A serious and contagious disease that causes discharges from the eyes and nose, fever, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, twitching, paralysis, and, often, death. There is no cure.

Canine Hepatitis - is a highly contagious viral infection. Symptoms range from a slight fever and congestion of the mucous membranes to vomiting, jaundice, stomach enlargement, and pain around the liver. Many dogs can overcome the mild form of the disease, but the severe form can kill. There is no cure.

Bordetella Bronchiseptica - A highly communicable bacterium that causes severe fits of coughing, whooping, vomiting, and, in rare cases, seizures and death. It is the primary cause of kennel cough

Canine Parainfluenza - One of several viruses that can contribute to kennel cough

Parvovirus -  A highly contagious virus that affects all dogs, but unvaccinated dogs and puppies less than four months of age are at the most risk to contract it. The virus attacks the gastrointestinal system and creates the loss of appetite, vomiting, fever, and often severe, bloody diarrhea. There is no cure.

Corona Virus - This is a virus that usually affects dogs’ gastrointestinal systems, though it can also cause respiratory infections. Signs include most GI symptoms, including loss of appetite, vomiting, and diarrhea. There is no cure.

Rabies - is a viral disease of mammals that invades the central nervous system, causing headache, anxiety, hallucinations, excessive drooling, fear of water, paralysis, and death. It is most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. Treatment within hours of infection is essential, otherwise, death is highly likely. Most states require rabies vaccination.

Leptospirosis - is caused by bacteria and can be found worldwide in soil and water. It is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it can be spread from animals to people. When symptoms do appear, they can include fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, loss of appetite, severe weakness and lethargy, stiffness, jaundice, muscle pain, infertility, kidney failure (with or without liver failure). Antibiotics are effective, and the sooner they are given, the better.

Lyme disease - is an infectious, tick-borne disease caused by a type of bacteria called a spirochete. Transmitted via ticks, an infected dog often starts limping, his lymph nodes swell, his temperature rises, and he stops eating. The disease can affect his heart, kidney, and joints, among other things, or lead to neurological disorders if left untreated. If diagnosed quickly, a course of antibiotics is extremely helpful, though relapses can occur months or even years later.


Important Medications For Your Pup

Heartworm & other Worms and how to prevent them

The worms enter their host through a mosquito bite when it is taking a blood meal. Residue on the mosquito's mouthpiece carries immature worms called microfilaria from an infected animal to an uninfected one. The immature worms migrate travel through the bloodstream and, after about two months, settle in the right side of the heart, where they begin to grow.

They mature after six months and can live in the dog's body for seven years, each reaching a length of up to a foot and constantly producing offspring. After about a year, a dog may harbor hundreds of these worms, although 15 is the average burden. The worms cause inflammation and damage the heart, arteries, and lungs eventually leading to organ failure and death.

Unfortunately treatment is limited and costly and so the best way to prevent your pup from ever getting this horrific disease is to administer a preventive and get yearly testing done.

to learn about what preventives are available and more information about this disease please visit the AKC's website at http://www.akc.org/content/health/articles/heartworm-in-dogs-symptoms-diagnosis-treatment/


These medications are also effective against other parasites, such as roundworms, hookworms, fleas, and tapeworms which takes the worry out of all worms in one dose!


Ticks and Fleas and how to prevent them

Ticks and fleas can cause infections, diseases, itching, scabs, hair loss, and much much more. Fortunately all of this can be prevented with one simple monthly preventive dose. For more information please visit the AKC's website at http://www.akc.org/content/health/articles/five-reasons-for-flea-prevention-products-this-summer/  


Puppy Socialization 

Just like with humans puppies have crucial developmental stages that start at 3 weeks of age and it's the breeder's job to guide the pups through this important stage so that they go home with their new owners happy, confident and well adjusted. To do this they have to be exposed to many situations, places, and people. Here at NE Arkansas Goldendoodles we ensure this by providing a huge yard for them to play in, a pool, and a inside play area with many toys to choose from. They also come into contact with people of all ages and dogs of all sizes. The importance of these socializations is to shape the pups into confident dogs that approach new situations, people, and dogs with confidence and happiness and not with fear and aggression. As the new owners of the pups it is their responsibility to continue this socialization into adulthood. To learn more about puppy socialization visit the AKC's website at http://www.akc.org/content/dog-training/articles/puppy-socialization/